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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 792 (some duplicates have been removed)
. employees of a big u.s. defense contractor in afghanistan appearing extremely drunk, fumbling and shirtless, on the job. a cell phone video obtained exclusively by abc news is igniting outrage over a scene that looks more like a rowdy frat house than the operations center of a company paid to carry out u.s. policy overseas. abc's brian ross brings us this investigation. >> reporter: in a place where terrorists have and will attack, at any time, these are some of the men being paid by american taxpayers to help provide security for u.s. civilian personnel 24/7. the security manager for an american company scientific, with a $47 million contract from the pentagon, staggeringly drunk in the operations center. >> kevin. come on. >> reporter: this is the company's medical officer. wived out, stoned, after shooting up with narcotics. >> please snap out of it. >> reporter: and this is the company's top on-site executive, in front of a bonfire, where, according to former employees, live ammunition rounds were tossed into the flames. >> it was like a frat house for adults. >> reporter: the footage w
they're both potentially vulnerable. also, shocking video shows workers for a u.s. security contractor in afghanistan allegedly partying up, seemingly so drunk and drugged they could hardly speak. >>> plus, a reason to take the window seat. we have the amazing story of how airline passengers spotted and help save a man who had been stranded at sea for nine days. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> monday's third and final presidential debate will be a serious challenge for both candidates. it's focused on international policy and arena where both mitt romney lacks experience and the obama administration is under growing criticism, especially when it comes to the situation in the middle east. let's start with cnn's white house correspondent dan loathian. i assume officials in the white house campaign they know the president has questions he's going to answer. >> reporter: that's correct, wolf. and there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the two candidates when it comes to forei
dollars to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out color. -- we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phyllis bennis is the new director for the international ism project. she joined us tonight from new york. it is good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you, tavis. poopsie but in and ryan went -- tavis: biden and ryan went after it tonight. it was interesting for a lot of people to watch. but we get back to it really matters, the two guys at the top of the ticket, president obama and governor romney. given that governor romney came back out with his own policy speech, that policy will get on to the agenda in the next two debates in the last debate is exclusively about foreign policy. we know we are headed in that direction but the speech that mr. ravi gave earlier this week, he essentially suggested that president obama had been weak on foreign policy. he went on to deconstructs that and explain it in a variety of ways. but yourhoughts on mr. romney's approach to put foreig
violence, what are you concerned about? >> first, the u.s. death toll an event -- afghanistan tops 2000. we talk about america's longest- running war. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. iran's currency has hit an all- time low amidst a worsening financial crisis brought upon by u.s.-led sanctions. on monday, the iranian rial dropped 15% to its lowest point against the dollar, capping a three-month contest that has seen its overall value drop 57%. the price of basic foods are on the rise since a new round of sanctions took place in july. a former u.s. ambassador to the un and under secretary of state thomas pickering criticized the act. it is not legal for them to pay for it. speaking to the council of foreign relations in new york, alioth parcel la hay says it has not backed away from its mountain of nuclear weapons. >> any country, including iran, uses meweapons of mass destruction, that is the end of the eligibility, legality, what ever you name it, of that government. weapons of mass destruction, as we said, i
and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the devel
in the u.s. intelligence community and had many high ranking positions in it, including executive director, director for the cia, and his final position was national intelligence officer for the near east and south asia where he provided analytical support. and he was a visiting fellow at brookings in the year 2000, and as a reserve officer in the u.s. army, and has also been publishing externally important literature the last few years since retiring from the government. so i will step out of the way now. .. >> what are the prospects for a new president achievement anding a peace setment between israelis and palestinians? i believe, unfortunately, that they are not very good. by a fair settlement i mean a two-state solution, a palestinian state on comprising gaza and the west bank with some modern negotiated land swaps with control of its border, its borders, its water resources, its air space. something similar to the clinton parameters of 2000. i believe that this outcome more than any alternative would satisfy the core needs for security and self-determination of both israelis and pale
at 8 on c-span. later, the candidates hoping to represent arizona's 9th district in the u.s. house, democrat kirsten and steven later here on c-span2. >> what is the dinner, and how did it come about? >> so the al smith dinner is the most famous that presidential candidates show up every four years, and they show up, democrats and republicans -- i mean, it's really a memorial dinner for smith, and i think it's the thing that if anyone heard al smith's name at this point in time, that that's where you heard about al smith unless you hang around these hallowed halls. it's his lasting legacy, the place where the name gets out. it's held every year, not just every four years. prominent figures come in, it's a memorial dinner, a catholic charity dinner. people get together to assess the legacy of al smith and presidential candidates always especially to crack jokes about each other. >> in fact, they show up together most times, show up both the democrat and republican nominees show up together. we want to show you some of the past al smith's dinners. >> might i ask if senior clark comes
. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but that created in hand and triumphalism and survivalism that very muc
necessarily lead to an increase in the importance of emissions of the navy and air force. the success of the u.s. and persian gulf war, the first persian gulf war the experience shock at the synergistic way in which the u.s.-led coalition spectacularly applied technology to the modern warfare. the fourth key driver has been the incredible development of the chinese economy that has allowed for and paid for the more than sevenfold increase in the chinese defense spending over the two decades. so, the pla today is a force that continues to emphasize its traditions, but also it has new ones. as we know, president hu jintao has talked about the historic missions which both reiterate the old and talk about the role of the global setting. the only part of which applies to the land forces as they've been increasingly participants in the u.n. peacekeeping operations. there's been some important developments in technology for the ground forces, particularly the two most important are the and provide in the tactical ability of the pla land force which is to say we now think there are less than five divisi
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq which syria opposed, and syria was turning a blind eye to cross into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there was a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to fail and they thought they were next on the hit list so they would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level syrian official told me later on, he said of course they were helping iraq. we wanted our guys to kill them. that is why we went into iraq. we wanted to get them out and get them through and you guys would kill them. and when he survived, particularly after the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february 2005 that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria. people in late 2005 for counting the days when the assad regime, there were syrian expatriates and organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that and i think that really created in him a sense of triumphalist and survivalism that very much infor
and general jim jones. >> i quite agree that my judgment is that much of the world wants u.s. leadership, they don't feel comfortable without it, but they no longer react to any dictatorial or any due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role america should play in the world. we should be playing the stabilizing role. we should be organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the onl
. >> thank you. thanks to having us again and again. i'm a u.s. correspondent for swiss newspapers but i have a question for you, henry. you haven't mentioned the governor of ohio at all in your analysis. was that on purpose or you don't think he plays a role? >> i've never found that governors matter a whole lot in presidential races. they don't poll states along with it. they can help of volunteer but their stamping or their popularity almost never actually comes over. the one thing i should've mentioned, i didn't though, is that the case it raise from two years ago is a good indicator. made ronnie's weakness. which is that john kasich after he left congress came from an investment bank backer and accuse running against somebody, before he was governor, was a representative from that west virginia part of ohio, and they rent a class warfare campaign. it was eyes on the side of the working class man, he comes on the site of the wealthy. and kasich in the atmosphere by 2010 only won by about two points. and if you look, he did much better in the affluent suburbs than he did in working-class a
a treaty of friendship and cooperation. by 1974, as egypt began to move into the u.s. orbit, syria emerged as the no. 1 ally. not to say there are no problems between the two sides. the syrian intervention in lebanon clearly displeased moscow as did its agreement to security council to hundred 42. it's one of the few states that supported the soviet invasion of afghanistan in 1979 and was richly rewarded with military aid as a result. that continued until the advent of gorbachev in 1985 to turn off the tap of military aid. the chill in the relationship continued until 2005 when a combination of increasing syrian isolation due to policies in lebanon and a much more aggressive russian foreign policy under vladimir putin established a close russian- syrian relationship we see today. let's look at the policies of vladimir putin in his second term. i see is reacting to be setbacks like the school fiasco, the orange revolution in the ukraine, and the increasing vulnerability of the u.s. in the middle east because of the invasion of iraq which -- and because of the revival in the taliban in afgha
to represent the u.s. at the united nations, on issues ranging from disarmament to world hunger. he launched a program with former republican presidential nominee bob dole in 2002 to provide education and food to poor children, in the u.s. and around the world. >> there is one problem that i am convinced we can lick, absolutely, and that's world hunger. >> reporter: mcgovern was awarded the presidential medal of freedom in 2000, and the world food prize in 2008. he stayed active until the end, backing then senator obama in the 2008 election. >> so let's seize that opportunity and vote to barack obama for a more hopeful world. >> and skydiving in 2010, celebrating his 88th birthday. >> how do you feel. >> i feel great. >> reporter: a prolific author, mcgovern wrote eight books including most recently what it means to be a democrat. almost no one knew better. bob orr, cbs news, washington. >> jeff: next america's 11 years in afghanistan. a report by david martin. >> jeff: after weeks of rumors that he was on death's door former cuban president fidel castro appeared in a photograph that was sho
saddam hussein. that only happened because of the u.s. invasion of iraq. but then even after the u.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to
heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing toy in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
mentioned before, one of the surprises in the report was how vulnerable the u.s. is still, despite the massive shale oil resolution -- revolution. this is not to say that the progress towards energy independence has not provided measurable gains in energy security and reducing volatility, but it is still there. even in a hypothetical world where the u.s. has not become completely self-sufficient in oil. oil markets are completely integrated and we will drive up prices everywhere, including the u.s.. so, while having diversified fuel diversifies away from oil into natural gas and all of this stuff, we will definitely see benefits. it is not a silver bullet that will completely solve the problem. >> steve, i want to go back to you. they were making your point. >> it is about what to do in a situation with ambiguity. my personal opinion, that is the most likely scenario for the iranians. maybe not over the long term, but certainly over the near term. >> next 10 years, perhaps? >> there are historical precedents for that. south africa actually has six nuclear weapons. they never tested
suisse 3r50iprivate bank. as an investor as we watch the maturation of the u.s. election campaign, what actually matters some. >> the fiscal cliff. obviously many things matter at the more detailed level, as well, but we're all worried about how that will be sorted out and the way that the white house goes, the way congress goes is pretty critical to that. >> have you heard anything from anybody that made you more comfortable, or is it just a big -- how do we price it in? >> when we talk to investor, the line we're getting is people believe that everything will be sort of all right on the night and that some neat compromise will be found. and that is the best central guess, but that's still worrying because it means you've got some if you like good news in the market and if things were to go wrong hfr- >> how would we price things going wrong? >> we would see a selloff in all sorts of assets. clearly in stocks and treasuries could go either way. but who knows. >> obviously we have to find out whether each party will budge on these core issues. we asked john mccain about this and we'll g
does anything that the u.s. government says, although we still say it. .. i remember when secretary clinton went on her first trip to china she had a forum with 16 women from different areas in china. was blogged, it was streamed, people would challenge the hiv/aids policy, incredibly brave women and secateurs clinton provided a forum for them to speak to a larger audience. these were the kind of things i think we can do. >> a question from right here in the room in the audience. president obama and governor rahm yo both said they want america to have a positive relationship with china but they must play by the rules. how well they pushed china if they think china is not playing by the rules, house specifically, dr. bader? >> how specifically will they -- >> push china if they are not playing by the rules? >> my last act in government, my last time around was second place in negotiations with a succession of the world trade organization. the world trade organization lays out in detail global rules. it was a 17 year negotiation for china, and it made extensive commitments. china used
the chairman of the house of endangering several libyans who have been working with the u.s. by not giving their names when he released 166 pages unclassified libya documents. heading tomorrow night's foreign policy debate are, i have to say, more confusing to me as a consumer of news than they have ever been. we talked about this early on. i will put myself in the category of people who were troubled. category of people who were troubled by what seemed to be a distance between what the reporting and what the intelligence agency seemed to be saying and what was coming out of the white house. i thought that gab was worrisome. we talked about it on the show. i don't know what to think anymore because what looked like it first was officially the u.s. government line was this was spontaneous and in reaction to the video. there was a parallel channel of reporting indicating it was premeditated, the work of al qaeda militants and had nothing to do with the video. there was no protest in the video. that is what happened. now we have reporting from the l.a. times and "the new york times" talking t
. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the attacks on our embassies in so many other countries lie solely with those who carry them out. no one else. but it is ouresponsibility and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape his not to lead from behind. leaving our destiny at the mercy of events. >> woodruff: for its par, the obama campaign aired a new ad that accused romney of injecting politics into a national tragedy with his initial response to the consulate attack. >> when our u.s. diplomats were attacked in libya, the "new york times" said romney's knee-jerk response showed an extraordinary lack of presidential characte
of sanctions that are devastating its economy. u.s. officials have dismissed the plans as untenable. the protests have erupted this week in iran amidst a worsening financial crisis this all the collapse of its currency. yemeni officials say u.s. drone strike has killed five people in the southern province. the attack hit two vehicles that were said to be carrying militants with links to al qaeda. the pakistani political leader imran khan has vowed to move forward with a peace march in debt highlighting the impact of u.s. drone strikes in pakistan's troubled areas. activists from britain and the in the state's, including codepink leader medea benjamin, are joining the march from islamabad to south waziristan despite concerns over security in remote areas. president to candidates in venezuela held closing rallies thursday ahead of sunday's election. president hugo chÁvez is facing challenger henrique capriles and what to be the toughest challenge of his 14-year rule. chÁvez, who is recovering from recent cancer surgeries, addressed hundreds of thousands of supporters. >> you all kno
. not in afghanistan but in the pentagon. the first wave of troops were u.s. marines and they wanted to bring their own helicopters, their own logistics units and didn't want to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar, and here was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was internal fighting within the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. in one other tale i recount in the book, we had some real serious infighting between president obama's own national security team and senior people at the state department over the whole question of, was it wise to try to broach potential piece take the taliban? and we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting in common purpose to try to achieve the president's goal in the country. >> host: who is summer koy. >> guest: she is a young american woman who -- there she is on the bottom right there -- who has extensive foreign development experience and p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 792 (some duplicates have been removed)